Wednesday, July 01, 2015

20Q7A: An interview with Stephen Graham Jones

I asked Stephen Graham Jones 20 Questions. He answered 7 of them - Not because he's a jerk (he's not - I swear), but because that's the format of this interview series. Anyway, enjoy...

If you could have chosen your own name when you were born, what would it have been?

​SGJ: Cody Mingus. Stephen Reiter. Both of which are students I've known. One of those names I've already used. The other I've got permission to—for me, not a character. Who knows. Might have to do it here soon. ​ 

If it was socially acceptable to wear anything as clothing, how would you dress?

​SGJ: A lot more pirate shirts.​ And I'd always tuck my pants into my boots. Also, my pants would probably also be breeches. 

What was your greatest Halloween costume?

SGJ: ​Zombie cheerleader, female. Competed in a contest where we each had twenty seconds to 'be' our costume. So I faked a cheer-routine, then did the splits. Had to wrap and ice my thigh for six weeks afterward. But I won that contest.​ 

If you could survive on one food for the rest of your life with no health repercussions, what would it be?

SGJ: ​That burned-black edges of beef brisket.​ Or burned neck roast from a white tail. In junior high one of my friends smuggled some of that to school in some foil—he'd stole it from his dad's lunchbox, I think—and we ate it in the halls all day. Some of the best eating I've ever had. But, the best meat ever? Shark on a stick at a Renaissance festival. Still, though, those burned-black brisket edges, man. They're right up there with the crumbs you can get at Long John Silver's. Which I once lived on for about three months, in the good old days. 

Are you most afraid of ghosts, aliens, or clowns, and why?

​SGJ: Aliens, definitely. I mean, a ghost, really, that's just an apparition, pretty much, and I've never quite keyed into the clown-phobia thing. But aliens, man. I shouldn't even be saying this. They're probably monitoring my stuff. ​Which is narcissism charading as paranoia, sure. But none of that matters when you're out somewhere lonely, and the sky's so open and empty above you. Once, running around barefoot on Air Force Academy land, I found some crop-circled grass out in a lost meadow. Which was cool and scary enough. But then there was also a perfectly severed front leg of a deer there too. Such a clean cut. In high school, coming home one night—this is West Texas—I have this clear memory of me and a friend driving in my truck down this one road, 1120. And I remember looking into the rearview, and it was all lights. At first I thought it was cops, but then they were high up and coming in fast, and too wide besides, so I thought plane, some crazy plane with more colored lights than make sense, some plane emergency-landing on the lonely road behind us. And then that memory just snips off. 

If you could be reincarnated as a sentient but inanimate object, what would you like to be?

SGJ: ​The moon. So long as I had really good vision. I want to watch what bears do when we're not around. I want to see large impossible shadows skating just under the surface of the big lakes. I want to see Bigfoot. But I'd be the kind of moon like in Conway Twitty's "I Don't Know a Thing About Love," ​who just hangs there above. "I just watch from the sky." We all want to be Uatu, yes? I mean, Uatu, he knows why we went bipedal, he knows how many times we left Africa, he knows whether we hunted or starved or mated the Neanderthals into extinction. He saw the last mammoth mire down in Siberia, and, those shadows I want to track just under the surface of the water? He knows them by name. But I can't be Uatu in this question. He's not inanimate. The moon, though. I'd be the moon, if I got to see cool stuff. And also if I could read books over people's shoulders. Because there's probably a lot of downtime, up there. 

What's your secret?

​SGJ: I don't partake of any reality television. Or any of those contest-talent shows. ​If I'm watching Jeopardy, I always mute that part where Trebek 'interviews' the players about their backgrounds and interests. Because that's a gateway. If I start caring about them instead of the facts, the information, the knowledge, then I'm already losing. I might as well just sit down on a couch, dig that remote up from the cushions, aim it right into my temple and pull the trigger.

-----

Stephen Graham Jones has fifteen novels out, and six story collections. The most recent is After the People Lights Have Gone Off (Dark House Press). Next is Mongrels (Morrow). Stephen's been the recipient of an NEA Fellowship in Fiction and has won the Texas Institute of Letters Jesse Jones Award for Fiction, the Independent Publishers Award for Multicultural Fiction, the This is Horror Award, and he's made Bloody Disgusting's Top Ten Novels of the Year. Stephen was raised in West Texas. He lives in Boulder, Colorado now, with his wife and children.

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

20Q7A: An interview with C.V. Hunt

Yippee! It's Misery and Death and the latest edition of 20 Questions, 7 Answers, with author C.V. Hunt!

What's your latest book, and how does it differ from your previous work?

CVH: Misery and Death and Everything Depressing is my latest publication. It’s my first collection of short stories and flash fiction. It also includes a novella.

Do you have any creative endeavors other than writing fiction (art, music, knitting)?

CVH: I have a plethora of paintings collecting dust in my closet. I’ve also been known to sew some costumes here and there and make some lame book trailers. I’ve waffled with the idea of creating music but I’m really lazy.

If it was socially acceptable to wear anything as clothing, how would you dress?

CVH: Loincloths for everyone!

Who or what is your favorite movie monster, and why?

CVH: Hannibal Lecter. I like plausibility.

Do you listen to music when you write, and if so, what? Is it different than what you listen to when you're not writing?

CVH: I listen to music almost all day. Most of it is electronic and trance with some synth pop and grunge mixed in. I actually make playlists on Spotify for the each book I write. If the playlist is marked WIP then the book and the playlist are incomplete.

There’s not much difference between what I listen to while writing and what I listen to throughout the day. Sometimes I prefer to listen to music I’ve heard before while writing so I don’t get distracted by a new beat or lyrics.

What is your writing environment like? (Are you out in public or in seclusion? Is there noise? Is there coffee? Do you type on a laptop or write longhand on lined notebook paper?)

CVH: I write in my living room with headphones and a laptop. A cup of coffee is usually by my side. I use to play music through stereo speakers but my neighbor’s dog has made it impossible to concentrate without blocking the world with earbuds.

What's your secret?

CVH: I’ll never tell. Mwhahaha!

---

C.V. Hunt lives in Ohio and has never won anything. She's the author of several unpopular books.

Learn more about C.V. Hunt:
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Goodreads / Youtube / Instagram / Spotify / Amazon

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

20Q7A: An interview with Douglas Hackle

Generic intro for this week's edition of 20 Questions, 7 Answers! Meet weird writer-person Douglas Hackle:

What's your latest book, and how does it differ from your previous work?

DH: I only have one published book, Clown Tear Junkies (Rooster Republic Press), which is a collection of my bizarro short stories. My latest completed works, though, are a novella tentatively titled The Hottest Gay Man Ever Killed in a Shark Attack and a novelette called The Ballad of TERROR TINY TIM, both of which are unpublished. The main difference between these pieces and my previous work is their length, since nearly everything I wrote before them is either short story length or shorter. However, thematically and stylistically, these longer works were written in the same general spirit of reckless, off-the-rails, batshit insanity that characterize the stories in Clown Tear Junkies.

Who or what is your favorite movie monster, and why?

DH: Probably the creature from John Carpenter's The Thing. It’s ability to assimilate and imitate other organisms, hide itself, and wreak havoc through paranoia always terrified and fascinated me. One of my traditions every winter is to watch a double feature of The Thing and Misery (when it’s snowy and cold out, of course). Annie Wilkes is a great movie monster too.

What's the best movie, new or old, that you've seen for the first time in the past 3 months?

DH: Probably either El Topo or Holy Mountain. Yeah, I’m little late to that party, but better late than never, duuude. See you at the pahhty, Richta!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

If you could have chosen your own name when you were born, what would it have been?

DH: Hmm. Well, if there were no restrictions on length, I would’ve liked to have been named the following:  I Know You’re About to Kill Me and Bury Me in the Shallow Grave That You Just Forced Me at Gunpoint to Dig Out Here in the Woods (I Now Realize That There’s Nothing I Can Do to Change This), but Please Don’t Escape Hospice Care a Year Later to Return Here on the Anniversary of My Death to Dig Up My Body, Gloat Over It, and Poke It with a Stick!!!

If you could survive on one food for the rest of your life with no health repercussions, what would it be?

DH: Totino’s Party Pizzas.

Do you listen to music when you write, and if so, what? Is it different than what you listen to when you're not writing?

DH: No. Most of the time I find music to be distracting when I write. But I do sometimes listen to music when I take breaks during writing.  Unfortunately, I am experiencing a sort of overall aversion to more or less all music. Consequently, my choices of what I can listen too are extremely limited. Specifically, I can listen to “Clowny Clown Clown” by Crispin Glover, “These Boots Are Made for Walkin’” (Crispin Glover’s version), “Stay the Night” by Chicago, and “Round and Round” by Ratt.  But as of late, my favorite things to listen to are recordings of babies banging on pianos on Youtube. This is my new jam right here:



If you could share a beverage with any fictional character, who would it be, and what would you drink?

DH: Moby Dick. J├Ągermeister.

---

Douglas Hackle is the author of the Wonderland Award-nominated CLOWN TEAR JUNKIES (Rooster Republic Press), a collection of bizarro/absurdist short stories. A selection of his short fiction is also included in the THE BIZARRO STARTER KIT – RED (Eraserhead Press). Hershel and Joffrey are hawt!!! TERROR MAN. TERROR FACE. TERROR CLOWN. TERROR CHILD. TERROR MAN. TERROR FACE. TERROR CLOWN. TERROR CHILD. TERROR HOUSE. TERROR SHARK. TERROR MOUSE. TERROR ANVIL. TERROR TOT. La la la la la la la la la!!! Tee-hee-hee-hee-hee!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Clark Park Festival

If you find yourself in Philadelphia this Saturday, June 20th, stop by the Clark Park Music & Arts Festival in West Philly. I'll be there selling books, and handing out stickers and bookmarks and good vibes.

Lots of other people will be there too. People who make music. People who make art. People who make food. Possibly other people too.

Anyway, come say hi. It starts at noon.

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

20Q7A: An interview with Kevin Strange

This week's edition of 20 Questions, 7 Answers is going beyond weird, past odd, and deep into Strange territory. Ladies, gentlemen, and others...allow me to introduce you to author Kevin Strange...

If you could have chosen your own name when you were born, what would it have been?

KS: It would be Kevin Strange. Because that's not my real name. I was a big Harry Potter head before I became a film maker and decided to take the LeStrange's name as my own, but shorten it because reasons. I don't like my real name. No offense to my family but our name got me picked on mercilessly throughout school and I could go the rest of my life without hearing it and be just fine.

Who or what is your favorite movie monster, and why?

KS: Werewolves are my favorite movie monsters. Always have been since I was a little kid and saw the Howling flicks, Monster Squad, Teen Wolf, Silver Bullet. Later when I was a little older, Dog Soldiers, Ginger Snaps, American Werewolf in London. I think when you hate everything about yourself and everyone in your life picks on you and makes you feel like a piece of shit, there's an appeal in that transformation from nothing into a powerful, sexy, violent monster that can rip all of the adversaries in your life into tiny ribbons. I was even obsessed with the role playing game Werewolf the Apocalypse. The werewolf art alone in that book was worth the 25 dollar price tag for the hardcover rule book. I didn't have any friends to play with, so that's pretty much all I did. Read the backstory of the werewolf packs, looked at the pictures and tried to draw my own werewolves. There was somehow a witchcraft book in my middle school library (this was the 80s when shit like that happened and nobody gave a fuck) which had a spell in it to transform into a werewolf under a full moon. I wasn't ate up enough to actually try to find the wolf skin and wolf piss to use to perform the ritual, but I fantasized about it a lot.

If you could be reincarnated as a sentient but inanimate object, what would you like to be?

KS: Are dicks inanimate? They grow and move around and perform functions so they move. But they're not sentient so I'm going with dicks so I can say I'd want to be a sentient dick. I'd ride around on my human host Krang style from the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, always dick-high from everyone we meet so I could check out their kibbles and bits. And I'd get to fuck with my face. Which I do anyway, but my face would be a dick so it would be like fucking everything with my own head. What was the question?

What happens when you die?

KS: You're dead and that REALLY sucks. I used to work for a dude who was convinced I believed in an afterlife because the thought of eternal oblivion scares the holy fucking crap out of me. I don't understand how that makes me some kind of closet theist. Oblivion doesn't sound fun at all. It sounds boring as fuck. It actually doesn't sound like anything because the human mind can't comprehend what that even means. Remember before you were born? No. Of course you don't because it's completely beyond human understanding. This dude's argument was that you can't be scared or feel anything when you're dead so there's nothing to be afraid of. SORRY DUDE, I'm afraid of FOREVER NOTHING! Next question.

What's the most disgusting thing about the human body?

KS: How about we start with the fact that it even exists? Why kind of cruel god makes up people and then shits them out in a world with absolutely no clue what they're supposed to do. They have to figure out shit like beating the other life forms to death with rocks and sticks makes it easier to keep on living with a minimum amount of the people they love and cherish dying at the hands of their food. Or that making fire is a good idea because it makes food taste good and cold kills you. Or that multi-national conglomerates and psychotic bankers control absolutely everything they see and hear in order to create mindless consumers whose entire lives exist only to serve the profits of a small group of evil men. We had to figure all that shit out on our own at the same time people create bombs and viruses to wipe billions of years of life off the planet in a single instant. And even if they don't, an asteroid could smash into Earth's fucking face and render 25,000 years of human progress moot in an instant. That's pretty disgusting. Maybe poop is more disgusting. Poop is pretty gross.

What's your secret?

KS: Secret to what? I have all kinds of fucked up secrets. I'm not telling you that shit. Are you crazy? Are you trying to become an accessory to some shit you're going to wish you didn't even know after I tell you? No way. So I'm going to assume you me my secret to success. Well, I'm not successful at all if success means that my art pays for my life in any way shape or form. And you'd think after ten fucking years of doing this bullshit that I'd at least be paying a mortgage off the crap I shit out. Nope. So let's assume you mean the secret to my output. Yes. Here we go. I write a ton of shit. What's my secret to writing so much bullshit? Simple. I'm never satisfied. As soon as I'm done with one thing I immediately need to start working on something else to try to chase that high I got the first time I created art that truly transcended who I was as a human being and represented exactly what I needed to express to the universe at that exact moment in time and space. That feeling of needing to communicate my helplessness, the futility of my existence, the tragedy of my fucked up life. I always want it. I always need it. It's the only feeling that makes me truly alive. Even if it only lasts for a second.

Do you listen to music when you write, and if so, what? Is it different than what you listen to when you're not writing?

KS: I listen almost exclusively to fantasy metal. Shit like Iced Earth, Dragonforce, Manowar, Rhapsody of Fire, Hammerfall, and Iron Maiden even though they're not fantasy, they're just the greatest band in the world. I used to listen to angry metal. I spent a lot of time listening to sad metal and industrial music. But now it's just the uplifting, heroic sounds of warriors fighting for freedom and justice against evil wizards and dragons. It probably has to do with the fact that my life is nothing but a sad series of terrible mistakes, missed opportunities, backstabbing friends and lovers, and failed attempts at making a living off my art. A real comic tragedy. So I listen to extremely positive music in order to keep waking up every day and pretending to be a functional adult so I don't just turtle up under my covers and rot away into the piece of shit I know I am. Anyway, I listen to this crap when I write, when I drive, when I eat, when I jack off. I just try to keep the positive vibes flowing constantly like some kind of last ditch effort or vain attempt at staying connected to the rest of humanity. Also it keeps me pretty amped up when I'm writing sex or fighting scenes which is pretty much exclusively what I write.

---

Kevin Strange is an award winning author with two published novels to his credit, ROBAMAPOCALYPSE and VAMPIRE GUTS IN NUKE TOWN, two short story collections, THE LAST GIG ON PLANET EARTH, and MURDER STORIES FOR YOUR BRAIN PIECE, as well as numerous novellas including MCHUMANS, COMPUTERFACE, and COTTON CANDY. He loves schlocky B-movies, Bizarro fiction and Iron Maiden records.

Find out more about Kevin here:
Website / Facebook / Twitter

Wednesday, June 03, 2015

20Q7A: An interview with MP Johnson

Well, I'm not sure two weeks in a row quite counts as consistency, but it's a start! Here's the second edition of 20 Questions, 7 Answers – this time with author MP Johnson.

What's your latest book, and how does it differ from your previous work?

MPJ: My latest book is Cattle Cult! Kill! Kill! from StrangeHouse Books. I’ve been working on this one for the better part of a decade, so I’m psyched that it’s finally out there. It’s about a cult of fucked-up farmers that sacrifices people to an even more fucked-up cow god called Bovikraaga. Lots of gore. Lots of weird.

My previous books, Dungeons and Drag Queens and The After-Life Story of Pork Knuckles Malone, were more bizarro, with a lot of comedy elements. This one is a bit more serious. It’s closer to the splatterpunk genre than bizarro fiction.

If you could survive on one food for the rest of your life with no health repercussions, what would it be?

MPJ: Cereal. There is so much variety! As it is, I eat at least two bowls of cereal every day. I often start with a healthy cereal, like granola or something. Then I follow that up with a dessert cereal like Fruity Pebbles. That’s a well-rounded meal!

Are you most afraid of ghosts, aliens, or clowns, and why?

MPJ: Aliens are jerks. Fuck aliens. I just don’t like secrets. I don’t like the subterfuge. Aliens don’t just kidnap you and probe you and insert weird things under your skin. Nooooo. They have to erase your memory of the whole ordeal. But then they do a shoddy job of it, so the memories start to pop up later, in bits and pieces. The images are incomplete, so your mind tries to complete them, and your mind always goes with the worst-case scenario. For all you know, the aliens were super polite and served you banana cream pie and the probing was actually the best sex of your life, but they don’t let you remember it, so your brain is all like, “Dude, something awful happened!” That’s lame. Ghosts and clowns are at least honest with their shit.

Have you traveled outside your home country, and if so, where? Where would you like to go that you haven't been yet?

MPJ: I’ve been all over the place. I stomped on the Great Wall. I fought robot monsters under the streets of Berlin. Punk rock shows in Mexico City. Wandering around the Amazon. Floating Chinese restaurants in Amsterdam. I get around, but I really need to check out Japan and Australia. I want to go everywhere.

If you could be reincarnated as a sentient but inanimate object, what would you like to be?

MPJ: Cher.

What happens when you die?

MPJ: I suspect it’s going to be confusing and frustrating. Probably a lot like the DMV.

What's the most disgusting thing about the human body?

MPJ: Probably carbuncles. When they get big and there’s like a full jar of mayonnaise in there. Gross. I actually don’t get too disgusted by all of the fun things the human body does, but I’m glad that other people do. I really play on that in my fiction. Vomit shooting from one mouth to another. Guts doing all sorts of neat things. A lot of readers of bizarro and extreme horror have seen all of it before though, so I try to keep it fresh. The bottom line is that you probably have at least a small amount of feces somewhere on your body right now, and that’s okay.

---

MP Johnson’s short stories have appeared in more than 50 publications. His debut book, The After-Life Story of Pork Knuckles Malone was a Wonderland Book Award finalist. His most recent books include Dungeons and Drag Queens and Cattle Cult! Kill! Kill! He is the creator of Freak Tension zine, a B-movie extra, an amateur drag queen and an obsessive music fan currently based in Minneapolis. Learn more at www.freaktension.com.

Monday, June 01, 2015

Surreal Sermons

I was a guest on Episode 36 of the Surreal Sermons podcast, which you can check out by clicking...right...heeeeeeerrrrre.

There's about an hour of me talking about junk food, Japanese toys, weird Philadelphia, anonymous musicians, and writing SuperGhost, among other things. It all starts around the half-hour mark of the show. (But listen from the beginning, so you don't miss my NBAS brother, Tom Lucas).

Big thanks to host Jeremy Maddux for having me on the podcast!

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

20Q7A: An interview with David W. Barbee

Well, heeeere we go! Today is the first installment of a new ongoing feature - "20 Questions, 7 Answers" - in which I interview writers of weeeeirdo fiction. Each writer receives the same 20 questions, but may only answer 7 of them.

Kicking things off is David W. Barbee, author of the recently-released The Night's Neon Fangs, among other fine bizarro word-based products. Enjoy!

What's your latest book, and how does it differ from your previous work?

DWB: My latest is The Night’s Neon Fangs. It’s a collection of four bizarro novellas and my fourth book from Eraserhead Press. My first novel, A Town Called Suckhole, was pure distilled Barbee. My next one, Thunderpussy, was a departure into cyberpunk. Now I’m releasing four stories in one package and I feel like each one is pure Barbee again. They’re gritty and grotesque, and it’s hard to nail them down as either sci-fi or horror, which is just how I like it. Best of all they’re full of monsters. There’s a demonic police bat, an alcoholic ghost, a cyborg serial killer, and an electric werewolf. I’m at my best when I’m telling monster stories, and Night’s Neon Fangs is chock full.

If you could have chosen your own name when you were born, what would it have been?

DWB: Bishop Danzig Chewbacca Vladimir Magnus Zebulon Batman Barbee, First of his Name.

Who or what is your favorite movie monster, and why?

DWB: This might be cheating since he’s also a comic book character, but… Swamp Thing. He’s weird, he’s slimy, he loves the environment, he dates Adrienne Barbeau, and in the sequel he fights a lamprey monster. That just rules.

What was your greatest Halloween costume?

DWB: When I was in elementary school I dressed as a Ninja Turtle like three years in a row, but one of those years was truly epic. My dad crafted a shell out of cardboard and glue, using old couch padding for the interior. It could be strapped to my torso like a real turtle shell, and I complimented it with a sweatshirt and sweatpants that were dyed green, along with some store-bought Ninja Turtle costume gear. I couldn’t sit down in my school desk, but damn did I look amazing.

What are your 3 favorite comic books (standalone novels or ongoing series) of all time?

DWB: That’s a hard question, because I love comics to death. First, I have to list Garth Ennis’ Preacher, because I love that book so much that I always mention it when someone asks about great comics. Second is the ongoing Saga by Brian K. Vaughn and Fiona Staples (everyone these days is hyping that book… and they’re right). Third, for a deep cut, is Ghost Rider 2099, because many of those 2099 titles were really cool, and a cyberpunk robot Ghost Rider is a huge testimony to that.

What is your writing environment like? (Are you out in public or in seclusion? Is there noise? Is there coffee? Do you type on a laptop or write longhand on lined notebook paper?)

DWB: Half the time I write at my workplace, which is a library. You’d think this would be a good place to write but too often I’m yanked out of the zone because of employee duties. If it’s quiet I can get some writing done there, but often there’s an old lady giving a kindly rant or a student who’s looked all over but just can’t find the print button. The other half of my writing is done at home on my laptop, usually late at night with a movie or some cartoons on the TV. So one environment is fluorescent-bright with mildly annoying people wandering through my attention span and the other is a shadowy man cave.

If you could share a beverage with any fictional character, who would it be, and what would you drink?

DWB: I’d meet Dr. Henry Jekyll and we’d drink his Hyde serum together. Then we’d have a few laughs.

---

David W. Barbee is the author of four books from Eraserhead Press, the most recent of which is The Night's Neon Fangs, a collection of four bizarro novellas. He grew up on an abandoned college campus and now lives next to one of the nation's most polluting power plants.

Find out more about David and his books here:
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Amazon


Tuesday, May 26, 2015

ANNOUNCING: 20 Questions, 7 Answers

Good news! I finally figured out a way to post something here at least once a week! :)

I'm going to start interviewing other writers.

Actually, I've already started. And the first interview goes live TOMORROW.

The basic premise is this: I've put together a group of 20 questions (some about writing, some about...other stuff...). Each writer who takes part in this little experiment will receive the same 20 questions. But they'll only be allowed to answer 7 of them.

Diabolical, isn't it?

Anyway, check back here tomorrow, and every Wednesday for...

20 QUESTIONS, 7 ANSWERS

...because I don't have a better name for it.

Monday, April 20, 2015

CONTEST!

It’s SUPERGHOST CONTEST TIME! Who likes PRIZES?

You do? Great! Here’s the deal:

I've got prize packs to send out to 3 lucky people. Winners will be chosen randomly (possibly out of a hat, but who knows), and each winner will receive:


- A piece of super-limited-edition SuperGhost Phantom Limb CANDY (only 25 exist)!

- A MYSTERY DVD from my personal collection! What will it be? You’ll have to win to find out! All I can say for now is that it will be something in the realm of horror/sci-fi/weirdo cinema, probably low-budget, and probably fun.

- A MYSTERY BIZARRO BOOK by another author! I’ve amassed a huge collection of bizarro fiction over the years, and somehow I’ve even ended up with a few duplicates here and there. So my bookshelves’ strain becomes your literary gain!

- SuperGhost STICKERS! You can stick them on things!

- MORE mystery items! Probably some sort of printed matter or small toy. To be decided mere seconds before each box is sealed up and shipped out.

Now, in order to enter the contest, you've got to do something. But the good news is you can earn more than one chance to win.


WAYS TO ENTER:

1. Buy SuperGhost between now and the end of Monday, April 27, 2015. It's available in paperback and ebook, and you can get it here and here. Send me a screenshot of your order confirmation, or something along those lines. And feel free to treat your friends and family - Buy multiple copies of SuperGhost for multiple chances to win! (By the way, if you’ve already purchased SuperGhost, don't despair - you can still enter the contest. Keep reading.)

2. Review SuperGhost between now and the end of Monday, April 27, 2015. No need to get too crazy - a couple sentences is just fine. Post a review on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Goodreads, or somewhere similar, and send me the link(s). Posting your review in multiple places gets you multiple contest entries.

So that’s it. Each purchase and each review earns you a chance to win. Buy SuperGhost! Review SuperGhost! Win prizes! It’s that simple. Good luck!